Wednesday, July 24, 2019

It’s Summer! Are you Hot Under the Collar?

Hot Under the CollarI think we can all agree that the weather has been a bit unusual in many parts of the country this year. It’s July, and some people are wondering if they will ever be able to put away their sweaters and winter coats. But many others are experiencing the summer heat with higher than average temperatures.

Extremes in the weather can have an effect on your physical and mental health, your attitude and your temper. This can lead to a greater level of stress, fatigue and irritability. Some of the factors to consider as you endure the hot days are:

Thursday, June 27, 2019

Simple Self-Care Advice for Improving Your Head-to-Toe Health

Simple Self-Care AdviceToday’s guest blog post is written by Kimberly Hayes, and I’m confident you will find her simple self-care advice to be informative and highly beneficial. – Dr. Todd

Doctors, personal trainers, life coaches, and the like can be helpful to all of us who try to live a healthy life. At the end of the day, however, we are responsible for our own well-being. That’s why taking steps each day to better our head-to-toe health is so important. If you’re looking to develop a lifestyle that fosters your physical, mental, and emotional well-being, here is some simple self-care advice to put you on the right track:

Friday, April 12, 2019

A Visit to the Park Improves Emotional Well-Being

Emotional Well BeingSpring is in the air in most areas of the country, and we can’t help but be drawn outdoors to enjoy a break from the icy chill of Winter! We know from studies and experience that getting outside can be a refreshing break from “cabin fever” but now we know that it might be easier than you think to enjoy the benefits.

The University of Alabama Birmingham conducted a study at three urban parks in Alabama that regularly have visitors. The study participants reported that they felt better after spending as little as 20 minutes in the park – even if they weren’t being physically active. An excerpt from the University’s report says:

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Seasonal Affective Disorder: Tips for Those Who Suffer from SAD

Seasonal Affective DisorderToday’s post is written by our guest blogger, Kimberly Hayes, Chief Blogger for publichealthalert.info,

Live, Work & Relate Well!

Dr. Todd

Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, is a psychological condition provoked by a seasonal change that results in depression. While people can experience SAD at any time of year, the majority of cases occur in the winter when daylight is scarce. An accepted theory behind the cause of SAD is that decreased sunlight exposure directly affects a person’s biological clock and disrupts their regulation of hormones, neurochemicals, sleep, and overall mood.

Symptoms of SAD are akin to those of major depression:

  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Hopelessness
  • Irritability
  • Loss of interest in activities once previously enjoyed
  • Changes in sleep patterns
  • Lethargy
  • Reduced sex drive
  • Unhappiness
  • Changes in appetite and weight gain